Virtual Event - Manage Change Effectively within Your Organization

September 30, 2020

The analytics industry changes constantly. With frequent updates to MarTech, modifications in team structure, and innovations in analytics processes and procedures, it can be difficult to manage all the changes and ensure they do not create chaos within organizations.

In this panel discussion, David Kirschner, Independent Advisor and Former Google Lead, Michelle Matranga, Director of Attribution & Digital Performance at RetailMeNot, and Andrew Geddes, Director of Consulting at ObservePoint addressed how to effectively plan and execute change management initiatives, lead change within your organization, and communicate changes clearly to teams and stakeholders.


Andrew

All right. It looks like we're live. Great. Welcome and everybody thank you for being part of this webinar this morning. We're going to be talking about managing change effectively within your organization. I've got a great panel with me today so we're going to hear from the experts and hear their stories about change management and, you know, maybe some horror stories, I guess, as we're leading into October. So let's, let's start off with some quick introductions here of who we have on the panel. I have Michelle Matranga and David Kirschner and then myself, Andrew Geddes with ObservePoint. So just a bit of background.

 

David has over 20 years of experience in the marketing and analytics industry. It all started when in 1997 his company had just launched its first website when David’s boss asked him, “Who’s coming to our site and why?” That single question prompted thousands of others within David’s curious mind, and propelled him to a career leading high-performing teams at Google, Adobe, Hotels.com, Zoosk, and Mars Inc. While at Google, David focused on their attribution products, so he brings a unique perspective to the panel.

 

Michelle Matranga is a marketing and analytics expert with over a decade of experience in the industry. She has dedicated the last eight years to the practice of attribution and incrementality. Previously, she planned, purchased, sold, measured, and analyzed digital advertising for clients like Warner Brothers and Disney and serviced the most advanced Google Attribution & Analytics offering to date during her time at Google. Michelle has also built attribution practices and managed platform onboarding for analytics firms and now leads the attribution department for RetailMeNot as well as running her own practice, Nomad Analytics. She also dedicates time to helping nonprofits with their analytics and data change management needs in her spare time.

 

So that's, that's a lot on your plate for both of you guys.

 

And so I'm with ObservePoint. My name is Andrew Geddes. I'm the Director of Customer Success. So I lead our customer success team and provide clients with insights and expertise on data quality. I've been at ObservePoint about five years and spent the last decade working in the SAAS industry for companies like Workday and Gartner, as well as a couple of startups. Previously, I was a broadcast journalism major. So hopefully this, it looks like we might've lost Michelle, but she's jumping back in.

 

So with that being said, let's get things started. And so we're talking about managing change effectively within your organization. And one of the first things that, you know, I think everyone wants to know everything, you know, everyone would be curious about is where do you start? What are the key components for a change management initiative? So Michelle, let's start with you on this question.

 

Michelle

Sure. So there's a couple of ways you need to break it down. First, you need to think about the data. So how does the data need to change and then the process. So what are all of the processes that happen right after the data changes? And like, if you're talking about marketing, if you're talking about business analytics, if you're talking about IT, or even like the sales organization, what are all those processes, how do they need to change? And then, also kind of the personal responsibility around that. So there's three main components that I really think about, when I think about big change management, data process and personnel.

 

Andrew

What about, what about the sponsor is kind of a question I had, but like how do you identify that key sponsor from the beginning? Okay.

 

Michelle

So that's a tough one. So, typically, the way you would like to do it is the highest ranking person that is involved in the process. However, sometimes that isn't always like who you're talking to day to day. It also may not be the person that's most involved. You need to make them understand how this data change process or any kind of change management affects them and get to kind of that C suite. And that's where you need to have that sponsor. An SVP works as well, as long as you can get enough movement down below.

 

Andrew

Gotcha. So, David, let's go to you here. So in terms of, you know, you've got kind of the initial key components established, you have the data process and personnel. So what are the key areas to lock in prior to launch? What do you need to get, you know, make sure this is off the ground before you launch this project?

 

David

First and foremost, you have to get buy-in. And to get buy-in is not as easy as one might always think, because any change management project is generally aimed at improvement, but improvement doesn't mean improvement universally across the organization. For some teams, it might mean extra processes, new processes. It might mean a change in personnel. So the first thing you really have to do is clarify the vision. Elocute the vision in a way that is understandable to everybody and understandable in a way that any further determine the WITFY what's in it for you. You really have to be very clear in terms of what is in it for you, but moreover, what's in it for the greater good? What's in it for the company? How will we emerge from this change management stronger? How will it impact you and what should you expect as we go through the process? 

 

A lot of those things are unknown at the outset. And it's okay to be honest that we don't know all the answers, but getting people prepared for change, knowing that there'll be ups and downs, knowing that many things beyond measurement might be affected by this. And most importantly, getting their buy-in before you move forward. You know, just to follow up on that last question with, how do you get executive buy-in? I've often said that without executive buy-in, you don't have a chance. You really need to go as high in the organization as possible. That person really should be leading the charge and when that's the case, it goes much smoother than having somebody, you know, who's say like middle or senior management, trying to, you know, chorale all the various parties involved in a measurement change.

 

Andrew

Gotcha. So this question is, following up to that, but how do you get everyone on board for that change? This is where you probably both have some horror stories, getting everyone on board in the change management initiative. How do you do that? Michelle, we can start with you.

 

Michelle

What you really have to do is to make sure everyone understands how this will affect the greater outcome. So whatever this change management is, and in my career, mostly it's been data change management. So making sure that everybody up the chain understands the impact and the value of this change. Once you kind of have that, and you can really telegraph that in a way that that makes sense, that is easy to digest, and it really gets the bottom line, which a lot of times is revenue, that really starts to get people involved and you really, really need, you need the top level, that C-suite, to really kind of get involved and say, this is what we're going to do and to really understand how it impacts the bottom line and, you know, truly impacts the way the company is going to function moving forward.

 

David

Yeah. I think that there's, and you kind of have to approach it on a role by role basis. I think, you know, Michelle and I worked together at Google on this attribution project and the one thing she, you know, saw even before Google made the acquisition of Adometry the company she was with was that certain individuals really benefited from a multi touch attribution program and certain didn't. So for instance, the paid search manager, not a big fan of attribution because in the last click model they do very well and that usually flows through to their compensation program. So prior to implementing anything that's going to change people's compensation, the way their metrics are looked at their opportunities for advancement it's best to do two things. One is to sit down with them and talk to them about why this is going to happen and acknowledge that yeah, their metrics may change, they may look better or worse and get their feedback too. Like what do you think would be a fair assessment knowing that, you know, there is going to be a shift in terms of attribution or contribution. And this, this goes for other types of measurement as well, get their opinion about, you acknowledge that this isn't necessarily the full truth. How would you feel would be a more fair way to evaluate your performance? You don't always have to take their suggestions, but they often have good ones and just asking makes a huge difference.

 

Andrew

Yeah. Have you ever been involved in a project where, you know, it's not, it's more communicated just top down or email and not communicated personally, like is there, I know there's gotta be a big difference there, but have you seen the difference in action?

 

Michelle

I mean, I think we both have examples here, but, most of the way that we operated within Adometry and in Google, was email. That's what we're working with and occasionally you get on a call and you can kind of hash it all out, but what you really have to do is make sure that everyone understands their importance in this change and kind of their role as well as how they will make a difference in the outcome. And that starts to kind of move things along, whether you're talking through email, conference calls, or in person, that's what makes a difference.

 

Andrew

And did you find that a lot of this, you know, you're working with people in various locations and teams? I mean, I'm thinking now in today's world where we have even more working from home and work remote, how do you factor that in?

 

Michelle

So, I mean, that doesn't change a lot for the way that Google was doing business like five years ago, we were, we were kind of doing it this way already. But if you were in a situation where you were a lot in person and now you're, you're kind of behind a computer screen, it's about making that personal connection and making sure they understand that you know their value. That was the biggest kind of hurdle is making sure that they understood, I know your value. I know where you sit in the spectrum let's make sure that your channel and your role still have value in this change.

 

David

You know, and ensuring that, you know, Michelle was excellent at this, at ensuring accountability, ensuring that everybody, like she said knows their role, but not only knows it, but knows what is expected of their role for this major program to work. Everybody plays a part in it. Sometimes it's a small part, but if that part fails, the program's not going to move forward. And so, you know, explaining that, like Michelle said, to each individual, here's your worth, here's your value, here's what we want to hear from you as this is going along. We want feedback. To your point, Andrew, the things that are managed down, they can work, they do work sometimes, but they don't have the same type of buy-in in the organization as things that are, you know, more collaborative, more context is given and more feedback is allowed from the employees. Those are the ones that are probably most successful.

 

Andrew

Let's dive into that a little bit more. Let's talk about that goal setting process, you know, what kind of goals do you set? How do you hold accountability for the goals? What is the process there?

 

Michelle

Yeah, so typically we create like a measurement plan that basically says, what's the hypothesis, what's the test we're running? Where are the success metrics? Where are we measuring those success metrics, and what is the, kind of acceptable up or down there? What's the threshold for success? And then, what do we do with that information once we have it? And that was kind of a big part of it. You need that very, very cyclical, understanding that data analytics and media planning all are kind of in a circle together. And it's the same in any kind of data situation. You need to understand where it's going, what's happening to it. What do you do with that information once you have it and then send it right back into that kind of cycle of what's the hypothesis now?

 

David

Yeah. I don't know that, you know, the co-location does provide a lot of challenges. I mean, it certainly does for certain people who are usually on premise, you know, the people who are in operations and engineering and literally keeping the lights on sometimes. But for the people who are involved in these programs, I think, you know, a strong communication program, plus that element of accountability and goal setting is usually adequate. And, you know, the funny thing is, one of the great things about measurement programs—attribution in particular, because it brings together so many people from across the organization—is when we were able to go onsite, and I'm strongly a believer that we will be able to do that again, sometime in 2021, we would sometimes have meetings where people from different departments say finance, marketing, and procurement had never met one another before.

 

And they were all excited about this project because this project might actually help each of them. And it was kind of fascinating. I think one was at, I won't mention the name, but I mean, one was somebody I remember very well in Texas that, literally people were shaking hands with one another across the table who had worked together for years. That's a little bit more difficult to do in today's day and age, but it's not impossible. I mean, look at us in three different locations, having a conversation about it. You know, it's absolutely possible, but the roles and responsibilities, the accountabilities and the timelines need to be very clear. And you know, going back to the goal setting, goals change, you know, you'll find as you go through any change management program, if everything goes smoothly and happy days, that usually is not the case, there's always hiccups. There's always, you know, malfunctions, delays, etc., and there's goals that do need to be reset. But you know, I think that, again, once there's a, if there's a group effort to reset them, if everybody understands what has happened to cause their goals to have to be revisited again, the buy-in is good, the program is strong and with that executive leadership, it will happen.

 

Andrew

Yeah. So set up that clear vision, clear communication, clear goals, and then be flexible. You know, that's definitely a big key, having that flexibility. I like that you called it out. In terms of having that flexibility, what are some things that like, what are some common stumbling blocks in the change management process, like things that you have to account for, or at least be prepared for, to be flexible and know that, you know, there could be change in the change management process.

 

Michelle

I'm happy to jump in here. Usually it is unclear communication of objective prioritization. So really understanding exactly what your objectives are and getting those very clearly in a priority line that that's very helpful. If that doesn't happen, that tends to be a huge stumbling block. One priority wants to jump over another and you end up kind of in this mass of where do we go from here. So to make sure those are very, very clear, huge, huge help, and executive stakeholder involvement. If you don't have that like Dave and I have been saying this entire time, but if you don't really have that high level involvement, it can go south very quickly, because you're trying to figure things out kind of down below, but without really understanding the company objectives. If you can align your change management with the company objectives, that's the goal. And implementation support as well. Like you really, really need a staff and usually engineers data scientists, and, you know, you need account managers, everybody all the way down to really be into the change and understand their role in it, and be able to support that implementation as well as maintenance

 

Andrew

Other thoughts on that, David? That's pretty comprehensive, but, you know, I know I've seen in my experience, you know, companies that are involved in whether that's a MarTech change or, you know, a change in the process, for data validation, you lose that executive sponsor, the executive stakeholder and, you know, you have a new team come in and new people come in, oftentimes that project gets put either put on the back burner or is completely different or doesn't happen anymore and can lead to a lot of waste and a lot of both time and resources, you know? So if you're in the midst of a change management project and you lose your executive stakeholder, what, what are some insights or thoughts on, on that?

 

David

Hmm. Well, two thoughts. One is that, you know, that sometimes happens that somebody leaves the organization in the middle of a change management project. That's indicative of one of two things. One, it was a really bad project and that person probably shouldn't be leading it, but more often that person has a different opportunity. And in that case, you know, whenever I've embarked on one of these things, you find hand raisers, you find those people in other groups who were like, this is great. I understand what you're doing. Let me help. Those are the people you have to lean upon. Hopefully they have enough sway in the organization and that doesn't always need to be a C level or VP level individual. We've all worked with people who are individual contributors who were exceptional and very well respected. They're good leads. If that's the case, take it down to the individual contributor level and let a well-respected "I see" run with the ball. It's always problematic because people always second guess, "Well, why is that individual no longer here? Is it the program or the individual?" But they don't need to be derailed. In fact, in many cases they can be emboldened by having a more engaged leader, step in.

 

Andrew

Find those people to step up, find that like hand raisers like what you said. So, it's great. So, you've overcome the stumbling blocks. You've got the change management project underway and ongoing, but do you have an end date for that project? Is this a stopping point? You know, at what point is the change management not change anymore? Start with you, Michelle.

 

Michelle

Well, I mean, this is kind of a Dave and I answer, we have encountered this time and time again, but sometimes change management means implementing a new process, which is in and of itself something that needs to be maintained. And in that case, you need to have kind of a maintenance process set up. But you need to absolutely at the onset of the project, understand if this is going to be a maintenance project or a one and done. That is huge. Really understanding if this is, do we need to put all these resources towards this one thing and then it's done, or do we need to put all these resources towards implementation? And then we also need to put resources towards maintaining this thing? That's been a very, very big thing, in kind of making sure businesses are successful once they kind of implement that change. And sometimes there is no end date if you're talking about like a real, like a data project, which is continually taking on data, you have to go into a maintenance phase, but then even understanding what the change management is of all of the roles and who's going to take responsibility and what all of those things mean.

 

David

Yeah. I think Michelle hit the nail on the head. There are some that are iterative and ongoing, and that are some that have a finite end date. It's always best to have some type of milestone say, you know, you're doing an attribution project, which is kind of an iterative ongoing project. It's the type of change that if done well, perpetuates. However, there are milestones, there's the milestone of the data collection, there's the milestone of the models being built and tested, and the return on ad spend being evaluated and so forth. And so for the people involved in the project, it's really helpful to have some sense of, okay, here's where we are. We're almost done. When you're done, you're not really done, you're just doing things differently. But at that point it's not change management, it's process management. And I think that's something you need to make very obvious.

 

Some projects have a very obvious finite date that we're shifting everything to you know, that once it's done, it's done and you continue business as usual. But if you're implementing, especially measurement changes that are going to have longterm implications, especially if you're a publicly traded company, and now you're reporting slightly differently to the street. Those are the sorts of things that milestones are important and certain people can drop off at certain milestones. Certain people's remit to the change management will be complete, but you know, above all transparency, is what keeps people going. Transparency about where are we? Am I doing a good job? Is the organization meeting its goals. And there's a few different ways to affect that. But that's key to any, any really good change management program.

 

Michelle

Yeah. I want to echo that milestone piece. Absolutely have all of these milestones, even the ones that you really don't think are, you know, they're not moving you forward in a huge way, but they are doing huge work on the backend. So like pulling all of your data together into one place, doesn't move you very far forward in terms of change management, but what does that do for your company and what does that mean? Make sure all of those things are milestones and that you celebrate every single one of them.

 

Andrew

I like that. That's important. Making sure you celebrate the wins as they come, because it's easy to overlook those when you're reaching for that grand goal.

 

Is there an advantage, like at what point do you say like, "Okay, we don't have the resources internally or we don't have what we need from our individual teams?" Like where do you involve maybe an outside consultant or do you recommend that in your experience?

 

David

I'll start with this one. I mean again, pros and cons to everything. If you have the resources, the wherewithal, the skill sets and the attitude internally to affect this change management program, there's no need to go outside the organization. The reason that a lot of people do is to get that independent point of view as to the new results. Are they true or not? I know Michelle and I went into a number of organizations where they hired us to show them the new truth. They knew that last click lied. And when we come in there and we show them the new truth, they were like, "This can't possibly be right. You guys are just smoking something." And that's absolutely the wrong mindset. So like in that case, a third party would be really beneficial. The other time that I think it's beneficial is for resource or skills augmentation. You know, my late father had a great saying, which was, "An expert as a man from out of town with slides." And, you know, while that was dumbing it down to the degree, it's kind of true. Sometimes having an independent third party come in to tell you how you're doing is much more plausible and resonates much better with the folks involved in the change management progress program. But Michelle, I'd be curious about your thoughts.

 

Michelle

I agree with you. One thing I would add is that change management in and of itself is a job. So you need to make sure someone has time and resources allocated to making that change. If that's not possible internally, then you should look outward.

 

Andrew

And in your experience, you do some consulting you have experience in that realm. Like how do you integrate with the teams? How do you get involved with people? You know, you probably go to a lot of organizations with people who are like, "Well, it's not broken. Why should I fix this?" You know, you have to have that battle. How do you deal with that?

 

Michelle

Well, most of them have hired me for a reason. So usually it's not this upward battle of why am I even there. It's just getting them all to trust me and that I'm doing the right thing for every single one of them. And that's just integrating with culture. And that can be done via zoom. I promise. It's very much about getting to know people, their roles and their value and what they perceive as their value. And then as you're integrating in that change management, all of those things.

 

David

And when you're working with a firm, you know, like Nomad or, you know, a third party firm where you've got people coming into the organization, the one thing you don't want to do is not have any representation from your company. You don't want to replicate the scene from office space, where people are going to meet the Bobs to learn about their new program.

 

Andrew

I was just thinking the same thing.

 

David

Yeah, keeps the bobs out of this. You know, you have to make the point that is internally driven, whether there's external people in the building or not, they're all there to help promote an internal vision.

 

Andrew

Yeah, for sure. So we've just got a minute left here, and in this part of the conversation. We want to jump into questions. So there's a few on the chat. If anyone has questions on the chat, feel free to go ahead and chime in and we'll start addressing those. But last question for the both of you, so what's the most important thing for the attendees on the call today? What's the most important thing for them to keep in mind as they lead change management initiatives?

 

Michelle

I would say, have a plan. Have an understanding of roles and responsibilities and what that change is going to be. And then once that change is enacted, what is it supposed to do? And make sure all of those things are in place ahead of time.

 

David

Yup. I would say, you know, just to build on that, you know, the expression measure twice cut once, you gotta measure about a hundred times before you cut on any type of new measurement program. You've got to pressure tested with the various organizations before you really roll it out to the broader organization. One way that I thought was effective, we did this at a prior company of mine was that we literally installed video dashboards around the office with some of the key metrics that we were trying to achieve and people would stand around them and look at them and they would disgust them. And that was the best part was when they started to discuss like, is this the right thing? How far, what can we do more about this? So the more transparent you can be, the more involved you can keep the rank and file in the program, the more successful I think it'll be.

 

Andrew

Totally. That measure twice, cut once resonates with me, my dad's a builder. So, I've heard that phrase many times. That was great. I appreciate your insight. I've learned a lot today, just moderating this. I really appreciate you guys jumping on. So let's dive into some of the questions. But before we do that contact information, if someone wants to get a hold of you guys, is that okay? So they connect with you on LinkedIn? What's your thoughts?

 

Michelle

You're perfectly fine to send it along.

 

David

Yes. Please. Please connect with me on LinkedIn, unless you're trying to sell me something.

 

Michelle

Yeah. LinkedIn is fine. Or if you want to contact ObservePoint and send my info.

 

Andrew

Perfect. Great. Yeah. So if any of you have questions beyond this and want to want to connect or want to sync up more, that's how to do it. So let's dive in a couple of questions here. So, first question, "When talking about a communication plan, how do you determine the frequency: over communication versus under communication? As well as the content to include in the messages? And do you have to loop everyone in all the time?"

 

David

That's a great question. Michelle, do you want to start with that. You look like you had thought?

 

Michelle

Yeah, I would say absolutely at the onset, over communication and over including is kind of the key. And then as you kind of get into the weeds, you find who your people are and you find the right frequency kind of organically, but over communication and include everyone.

 

David

Yeah. I couldn't agree more, and taking it even a step further, create like a playbook for the organization. So people can refer back to it or a Wiki of “What are these new terms are and what do they mean and how are they going to affect me?” So that when somebody says, "I didn't know," you can't, it's not an argument. You were informed, you had the resources to learn. If you didn't, that's on you. Get on board, the program's moving along. So, I mean, I do think that over-communication is better. And, you know, even when there is a hiccup, people know when there's a hiccup because they're involved and word spreads. So the sooner that that gets out, what went wrong, how you're going to ameliorate the problem and how you're going to ensure it doesn't happen again, that's also a very important communication. It really does build trust in the organization.

 

Andrew

Great. Let's move on to the next one. So, "Who in an organization do you feel is best qualified to drive change management projects? Is there a particular role that seems more qualified?"

 

David

Right. My tip has always been, and this is a little left of center cause everybody's, "Oh, it's the CEO, it's the VP of Marketing. It's, you know, maybe the CDO.” I like to have the CFO lead this project for a couple of reasons. One, they don't get to do much of this stuff. This would be fun for a CFO to lead. Secondly, CFO's have a far longer tenure than CMOs. I think it's like five to one in terms of how many years they usually stick around. And third, they usually are among the most trusted people in the organization. Since these measurement programs are designed to save the organization money in almost every case. They have a vested interest and they're usually very effective at marshaling the resources downstream needed. So by no means, should you cut out the VP of marketing or any of your operations people, but I really like to have strong involvement from the CRO or CFO.

 

Michelle

I tend to like the CTO myself. That tends to kind of move the forces a little bit easier and they have engineering under them. They can move everybody to get support for a project. But I understand what Dave is saying.

 

Andrew

That's interesting insight. CTO definitely makes sense, CFO. I like that they're more of a numbers driven approach probably with the CFO. So I guess, I guess the answer there's a lot of ways to do that. It's identifying the person who, who really will drive, drive change best within the org.

 

Michelle

Honestly, it's the person who believes in the project and will get behind it and push resources, time, and effort towards it.

 

David

It is really difficult though, you know, being, even at a director level, even being senior management to promote a project like this, because it always goes across departments. And while you may have great respect and sway within one department, another department may never even heard of you. And that's why, even though these people who are, you know, middle senior management are perfectly capable of effecting this type of change, having that C-suite presence kind of cracks the whip a little bit more effectively, I find.

 

Andrew

Yeah. Someone to bring everyone together. Yeah, for sure. Alright. So we've got one more question here and we'll see if any others come in here, but, "How do you cross the transparency chasm on leadership?"

 

David

I'll start. I mean, vulnerability. When I was at Adobe, that was one of the greatest things I learned at Adobe. They're very big on leaders showing human traits, showing that they're vulnerable, showing that they make mistakes, showing that, like you, not everything goes perfect for them. And I think that, you know, having somebody who can demonstrate that, "Hey, this was my idea. I saw it through and I messed it up and I'm gonna fix it." I think that's really helpful. Communication as we discussed before, visual aids, as you know, I brought up before, those are all really helpful, but at the end of the day, the companies I've worked with who are the most successful who have the happiest employees are the most honest. They don't withhold information. They disseminate whatever is possible in terms of data. And they own up to their mistakes, sort of going back to the concept of accountability. It goes right up to the project leader and they have to admit fault when they're guilty.

 

Andrew

Yeah. That makes a lot of sense. So we had another question, "Any tips or techniques on how to learn about people as quickly as possible. So navigating an org politics or quickly discovering who your right people are, et cetera." That's, that's a really good question.

 

Michelle

Sometimes one on one conversations are the best place to do that. So kind of, understand who in the org is going to be involved and set up one on ones with all of them. Get to know them, they get to know you, you build trust and you understand where they think their value is and where this particular project can bring value to their directive.

 

David

Yeah. And then, you know, any major change management program usually has some type of a committee that meets with some regularity. And usually the people who report into the people on the committee know about this, the people who are saying to their manager, "Hey, next time the committee meets, could you bring this up? That's the person you want to pull in?" Another thing I've done is to put out anonymous forms, or forms where you can put in an email address, even better with suggestions. And some people will leave rather detailed suggestions, when they don't have to do it one to one. Reaching out to those people to discuss those suggestions not only makes them feel involved, but there's some darn good suggestions that come in a lot of the time from all parts of the organization. So by no means do executives have all the answers. In fact, generally they don't. They need the support of their staff to come up with those. And the more you can involve people to a degree the better. The more involvement, the more buy-in, generally the better ideas you're going to create.

 

Andrew

Yeah. Would you say it's important to make sure everyone has a voice, like feels like they have a voice?

 

Michelle

Absolutely.

 

David

Yeah. Everybody who's impacted, there will be some measurement programs or, you know, other types of programs where people really aren't impacted, but may have an opinion about it anyway. That's a lot, you know, that's a different situation. And sort of making sure that those voices are heard, but not, you know, interfering with the goals of the program, is important as well. But yeah, I mean, even a company as big as a Google or Adobe, you know, everybody, Michelle will agree, everybody has an opinion at Google, which is not always the greatest thing, but usually it is. Usually just that, you know, melding of minds leads to some really, really wonderful ideas.

 

Andrew

I love that. Let's see any last questions from the group before we go ahead and wrap things up. There were a couple shout outs I wanted to point out you had a shout out David saying you are an incredible leader and have a comprehensive technical grasp of the industry. So great shout out there.

 

David

Checks are on the way. Thank you.

 

Andrew

I would agree as well. Well, David, Michelle, any last things that you would like to say before we go ahead and jump off here?

 

David

No, just don't be scared. One of the best pieces of advice I ever got was, "What's the worst thing that could happen." And some bad things can happen if you're going on a program like this, but nothing that's going to cost you a limb, or probably even a job, or your reputation. I mean, if you're transparent, if you're honest, if you're driven and you have a plan, things will go wrong, but don't worry about it. You know, don't worry about the little things. Think, focus on the big picture, realize that there's going to be hiccups, and keep pressing forward while getting feedback from everybody involved. And you'll have a successful program.

 

Andrew

Perfect. And let's answer this last question, "How to bring diversity of thought to data initiatives."

 

Michelle

I mean, bring engineering, product, marketing sales, bring everybody to the conversation and you will get a lot of diversity of thought.

 

Andrew

Yeah.

 

David

Yeah. That's absolutely true. Developers, the people who are like literally hands-on with the data, they're very intimate with it and they definitely have some thoughts about how it can be improved or syndicated better. So that's, that's an excellent thought. Michelle.

 

Andrew

Perfect. Well, David, Michelle, thank you both for, for sharing your expertise. This has been fantastic. Feedback from the chat has shown everyone has found this to be very useful. So thank you again, and thank you to all of you who attended. The recording will be available to share with others and hopefully we'll see you at our next event. Okay. Thank you everybody. Thanks, bye.

No Previous Videos

Next Video
DTM to Launch: How to Ensure a Smooth Migration
DTM to Launch: How to Ensure a Smooth Migration

Join Mark Stringham, Co-Founder of Metric Partners Consulting, and Mike Maziarz, Product Manager for Observ...